Tipp No. 117: “Massive Wooden Intruders” by Sculptor Henrique Oliveira (Brazil)

arts, Kunst

Wow! These sculptures are truely massive!

Powerful, they seem to slowly intrude into the space – owning it soon.
The wooden sculptures make their way. No one seem to be able to stop them.
Even if they burst, crack and splinter due to the high pressure and force that drives them, they move forward.
The sculptures grow organically like cancer and join forces with other branches.
Doors or entrance halls are too small to manage the expanding wooden bodies.
On first sight, the growth or dynamic seem to be chaotic but on 2nd sight you will discover that they inconsiderately target the same direction / destination that they will destroy and transform because of their sheer mass & nature.

Walls cannot impede them.

Entrance Hall of the Museum

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Hailing from São Paulo, Brazil, Henrique Oliveira is an award-winning artist that has exhibited his work around the world. Born in 1973, Oliveira received his BFA and Masters in Visual Poetics from the University of São Paulo.

While Henrique is also well-known for his paintings, this post focuses on his incredible wooden sculptures and installations. Using a combination of reclaimed plywood, fencing and PVC, Oliveira creates organic wooden sculptures that have a movement and flow that makes them feel liquid.

Oliveira’s installations are massive, often overtaking entire rooms and spaces. He first forms his shapes with PVC and then meticulously wraps it in layers of plywood, stripping away layers to reveal different colours of wood.

Be sure to visit Henrique’s official site to see his entire portfolio of work including his paintings and smaller-scale sculptures.

Tipp No. 85: “: The Only Truth” Digital Arts & Paintings by Tammam Azzam (Syria, now: Dubai)

arts, Insights, Kunst
Photomontage – Klimts “The Kiss” as graffiti on Syrian ruins
Bon Voyage Series
Syrian LIberty Statue (l-h-s); Bon Voyage Series (r-h-s)

ABOUT THE ARTIST

“Desparation is the Only Truth”

Born in Damascus, Syria in 1980, Tammam Azzam received his artistic training from the Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Damascus with a concentration in oil painting. Alongside a successful career as a painter in Syria, Azzam was a prolific graphic designer, an experience that would inform his digital media work after relocating to Dubai with the start of the country’s conflict.

The initial phase of Azzam’s work was distinguished by a ‘hybrid form’ of painting with applications of various media that allowed him to arrive at tactile interactions between surface and form that multiply as compositions evolve. These semi-abstract works use unconventional materials such as rope, clothespins, and other found objects in order to accentuate the depth, texture, and space of laboured picture planes, creating a visible tension. Although outwardly different in appearance, the series that resulted from these early experiments were inspired by the artist’s changing perceptions of specific urban environments.

Following the start of the uprising in Syria, Azzam turned to digital media and graphic art to create visual composites of the conflict that resonated with international viewers. These widely distributed works are informed by his interest in the interventionist potential of digital photography and street art as powerful and direct forms of protest that are difficult to suppress. In early 2013, Azzam made worldwide headlines when his Freedom Graffiti print went viral on social media.

Recently, he has returned to painting with Storeys, a series of monumental works on canvas that communicate the magnitude of devastation experienced across his native country through expressionist compositions of destroyed cityscapes. Chronicling the current state of his homeland, Azzam delves into a cathartic exercise of reconstruction, storey by storey. Alongside these new paintings, he has produced a significant body of giclée prints and installations that depict the facets of cities through similar themes.

Tipp No. 21: “Interlinked Despite of Socio-cultural Barriers” – Contemporary Art by Reena Saini Kallat (India)

arts, Kunst
salinenotations_echoes-22
Echoes (saline notations; poem quotation)
salinenotations_echoes-5
‘Hyphenated Lives’, Installation View
Reena-Saini-Kallat-Woven-Chronicle-866x487
Globalisation + Networking + Migration + Boundaries + Connections…About finding poetry in politics.

The Artist

Reena Saini Kallat’s (b. 1973, Delhi, India) practice spanning drawing, photography, sculpture and video engages diverse materials, imbued with conceptual underpinnings. She is interested in the role that memory plays, in not only what we choose to remember but how we think of the past.

Using the motif of the rubberstamp both as object and imprint, signifying the Bureau-cratic apparatus, Kallat has worked with officially recorded or registered names of people, objects, and monuments that are lost or have disappeared without a trace, only to get listed as anonymous and forgotten statistics.

In her works made with electrical cables, wires usually serving as conduits of contact that transmit ideas and information, become painstakingly woven entanglements that morph into barbed wires like barriers.

Her ongoing series using salt as a medium explores the tenuous yet intrinsic relationship between the body and the oceans, highlighting the fragility and unpredictability of existence.

Please, feel free to visit her website for any further information: http://reenakallat.com/

Tipp No. 110: “Iranian Poster Art” – How to bypass Censorship

arts, Insights, Kunst, Tipps

I like calligraphy very much.
Already as a little girl, I taught myself to write gothic letters, Sütterlin and together with my best friend, I tried to master my first Hanzi characters (Chinese).
No wonder that the awesome Iranian Poster Art attracted me immediately.

Besides I` ve got a preference for art work with a message instead of being just decorative or descriptive.

I hope, I can make you curious.
Have a look… 

A poster by Mehdi Saeedi
HIV campaign poster by Ramyar Vala
A poster by Morteza Momayez
A poster with calligraphic transformation in line with
the aesthetic heritage and traditions of the Middle East by Mehdi Saeedi
A poster by Ghobad Shiva, inspired by one Milton Glazer
designed for Bob Dylan in 1966.
Depression Poster by Mohammed Jamshidi
Poster against “manspreading”
Poster by Shadi Rezaei

THOUGHTS

Because the Iranian regime does not grant artists the freedom to fully express themselves, the Iranian poster artist & designer have developed a graphic language that uses visual puns, metaphors, and indirect messages.

For instance, Ramyar Vala couldn’t use obvious imagery in a poster he designed in 2009 for an organization that helps HIV carriers, so he used a banana as a phallic symbol and covered it in golden armor (see above).

In contrast to fields such as fashion design, industrial design and architecture, which are so influenced by globalization that the final products look similar all over the world, the alphabet in these posters preserves the local identity. The posters integrate the clean minimalism that characterizes contemporary art with the complexity that informs Persian typography.

Unfortunately, I couldn`t get hold of a translation of the writings yet. If there is somebody, who can be of help….please?

Postcard No. 26: “HELSINKI …radiates – not only in January”

arts, Insights, Kunst, Reisen, Tipps, Travel
The LUX Helsinki Festival 2019 has definetely conquered the Darkness. The “Ultraviolet Gallery” of animal portraits in Finlandia Halls forecourt.

The Helsinki Music Centre and its “Moonlight” Installation
Finlandia Hall Installation – in “Clear Water”-Blue
Oodo Library with quotation of the Cat Stevens song: Colours & Kids…
“We wanted to be the sky.”
The “Large Pendulum Wave” – a kinetic light installation that represents the poetry of mathematics and the beauty of physics
Colourful, warm welcome of the visitors by the Helsinki City Hall

Damn!
Did you miss the LUX Helsinki Festival 2019 too?


…just due to the fact that you have never heard about this stunning event?
Next year, we won`t have any excuse because here you are….some information about the awesome LUX Helsiniki Festival that transforms familiar buildings and spaces into unique works of urban art and attracts more than half a million visitors each year:

HELSINKI RADIATES – HOW TO ENLIGHTEN PEOPLE IN PERIODS OF DARKNESS (“OMG! Maybe, I watch too much world news, sorry!”)

Lux Helsinki sheded some light on the Finnish capital in its darkest winter hour with comforting annual regularity (January 5–9 in 2019). Artists from Finland and all over the world created a glowing urban gallery of colour, warming the city’s soul in the void that remains when Christmas and New Year’s Eve have come and gone.

The free festival offered a recommended trail complete with official guide and map, and combined established works and specially commissioned installations.

In 2019 LUX extended to include satellite attractions at Helsinki’s Old Student House and Cable Factory Cultural Centre, as well as the Hanasaari Swedish-Finnish Cultural Centre in neighbouring Espoo.
Helsinki’s magnificent new central library, Oodi (the name means “ode” in Finnish), took pride of place on a route of 12 lighting features leading past Finlandia Hall and the National Museum and looping through the district of Töölö.

Themes varied from simple visual delight to more challenging ideas. At Finlandia Hall, Immanuel Pax’s installation Trespassing explored the sinister ubiquity of security cameras. Outside the National Museum, Mexican Ghiju Diaz de Leon’s Shelter Seekers addressed issues of migration and climate change.

Exact weather conditions are hard to predict in early January, but they’re always likely to be chilly. Over the years Lux Helsinki visitors have braved everything from sleety blizzards to bone-freezing Arctic blasts.

(Article by Tim Bird, Jan. 2019 …Or did you think, I `ve mastered the English language in the meantime? That`s still work in progress.)

The exact week of the LUX Helsinki Festival 2020 is not published yet. But traditionally – also because of the long winter nights – the festival takes place in January.

For further details: https://www.luxhelsinki.fi/en/

Tipp No. 107: “The Body Is The Body” – Sculptures by David Hollander (USA)

arts, Creatures, Kunst

When I came across David Hollanders awesome work the first time, I thought the “classy” terracotta-colored body fragments with cracks or completely broken bodies might be archaeological findings…Despite of being damaged and broken, they outlast time and become gracefully an integral part of their surroundings – like the beautiful horse heads.

Frankly speaking, a few art pieces – in particular sculptures of the series “Hands” – are a bit scary in my view. I felt unconfortable looking at them. Please, feel free to visit his website to gain your own impression. In fact, these hands (that seem to burnt or hurt) or other body parts remind me on the forensic medicine lectures a took, when I was a student. I also thought of grave goods, but maybe I am off the track.

Well, I guess art shall communicate with the viewer, provide food for thoughts and in a best case scenario, arts shall also trigger emotions. Thus,….well done, David.

Eleven Hands,  L: 84” Terra Cotta, Acrylic Paint.
 Horse Head 7.   L: 21” Terra Cotta, Paint.  

Gold Horse Head, Snow.  L 23″ Unfired Clay, Paint; Colorado.
Horse Head, Hand.  H: 30”  Terra Cotta.
Whale and Bird, #1.  H: 12”  Terra Cotta , Wood, Wax, Paint.
david_hollander_2012
David Hollander

ABOUT THE ARTIST

David Hollander is an US American sculptor, who lives in Colorado close to the Rocky Mountains.  He spent a year and a half living and traveling through Dublin, Bologna, Lecce, Rome, Crete, Paris, Abu Dhabi, Istanbul. David has also lived and sculpted in Sydney, Australia and Seattle, Washington.

He is an MFA candidate in Ceramics at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan and showcased his art pieces at various notable international exhibitions. His work is part of different private collections. Furthermore, David Hollander has created various public installations in the States, Canada, Australia and Europe.  

His Education

  • MFA Candidate, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 2019.
  • BA, Cum Laude, Ceramic Arts, Minor in Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, 2002.
  • Exchange, University of New South Wales, Sydney Australia, 1999-2000.

His Residencies and Fellowships

  • Fellowship Recipient, Resident Artist, La Macina di San Cresci, Greve, Italy, 2012.
  • Resident Artist, Paese dei Balocchi, Bologna, Italy, 2010.
  • Resident Artist, Pottery Northwest, Seattle WA, USA, 2004-2006.

His Teaching, Lectures, Publications

  • “Contemporary Clay Shapers 2:  Thinking Through Material” Monthly Ceramic Art, South Korea, July 2018, Vol. 268. 
  • Teaching Artist at Cranbrook Art Museum Create Camps, Bloomfield Hills MI, 2018.
  • Visiting Artist Lecture, Zayed University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2010.
  • Sculpture Instructor at Kirkland Art Center, Kirkland WA, USA, 2009.
  • Sculpture Instructor at Pottery Northwest, Seattle WA, USA, 2006-2009.

For further information, David Hollander can be reached at dfhollander@gmail.com

Please, feel free to visit his website too: https://www.dfhollander.com/

Tipp No. 13 (revised): “Poetry of Urban Solitude” – Fine Art Photography by Pedro Correa (Spain, now: Belgium)

arts, Kunst, Tipps

“Poetry of Urban Solitude” (cit. Washington Post) is a perfect description of Pedro Correa`s fine art photography that seems to push the boundaries of abstraction and photography.

Urban lifestyle is fast-paced, busy and often a bit superficial, as we all know. Astonishingly, Pedro Correa manages it to capture a moment of melancholy and truth. His work shows the moment somebody is pausing for a split second and possibly reconnect with oneself and his emotions unintentionally — before taking a deep breath and hurling oneself into the hustle & bustle of the awakening urban jungle again. In this context, I thought of the Zen-inspired imperative of “living in the here & now”, frankly speaking. But what if the “here & now” let us painfully feel our loneliness and unmet longings?

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE JUST A DISCONNECTED OBSERVER?

The rare moments of courage & inner strength somebody displays his true state of mind – allowing others to empathically bond with this person and finally with themselves too – ….are pure poetry.

On the other hand, it is quite comfortable and exciting to take the role of a laid back, remote observer without being too much involved in the disdainful all-day life others seems to be entrapped. It sharpens your perception, lateral thinking skills and allows you to dig deeper than others who might be personally involved. And admittedly, observers wrongly used to feel a bit superior and therefore, less vulnerable.

ABOUT CROSSING THE THIN RED LINE

To close the loop: Yes, in my view Pedro`s works include this element of observation …. in both senses, as described above. This ambivalence creates a tension which is fascinating to me. Obviously, there is a very thin red line between independence (being an observer only) and feeling disconnected. The dosis makes the poison.

However, these are just my thoughts…Actually, I instantly fell in love with his photo “Lazy Sunday” in particular.

Despite of my fear that somebody will purchase the last edition of Lazy Sunday before I am able to get hold of it, I`d like to share this awesome photography and other impressive examples of Pedro Correa`s “Urban Poetry” with you….

Lazy Sunday, 2013
Espresso Bar
The Sun Is Shining Above The Clouds
Winter Rose, 2014
CheckMate, 2014

About Pedro Correa

Born in Madrid in 1977, Pedro Correa moved to Brussels at the age of 14, where he studied oil painting and comic art at the Brussel’s Royal Academy of Arts in parallel with a PhD in image processing at the University of Engineering of Louvain.

POETRY OF MOMENTS OF EMOTIONAL FRAGILITY

In his artistic development Pedro Correa soon became fascinated by photography and the possibility to capture poetic and fragile moments.

Clearly influenced by his impressionistic painting background (his mother is also a painter), his style was born by experimenting with ways of injecting the emotions of impressionism into the “decisive moment” of photography, without manipulating or digitally retouching the image. He soon became able to create a body of work that transcends what lies in plain sight, by giving as much importance to a rigorous composition of the image as to the subtle and invisible atmosphere that is part of the scene.   

URBAN IMPRESSIONS THAT MAKE THE UNSEEN VISIBLE

After leaving his day-job as a Project Manager for a multinational corporation in 2012 in order to become a full-time fine art photographer, he created his most transversal body of work, Urban Impressions, as a manifest for reconnecting with the invisible and the present moment, in order to find the beauty that surrounds us without us noticing it.

His works have been exhibited and acquired worldwide by public and private collections, and is currently represented in galleries of Washington DC, London, Paris, Ile de Ré, Basel, Antwerp and Brussels.

“In 2017 the Washington Post critic defined this series as “poetry of urban solitude”.

Pedro Correa`s works have been exhibited and acquired worldwide by public and private collections, and is currently represented in galleries of Washington DC, London, Paris, Ile de Ré, Basel, Antwerp and Brussels.

Bildergebnis für pedro correa photography
Pedro Correa

Please, feel free to visit his website with further galleries, sales offers and updated information about his exhibitions:

Website: http://www.pedrocorreaphoto.com/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/pedrocorreart

Contact:
Email: pedrocorreaphoto@gmail.com

Tipp No. 27: “Amazing Dynamic Pixelated Wood Sculptures” by the Taiwanese Artist Hsu Tung Han

arts, Kunst, Tipps
Hsu-tung-Han-sculptures-alchemie-88×71×65cm

Another case of LOVE of First Sight….(see above)! …and no budget available to get hold of one of his masterpieces…

Please, find more photos of Hsu Tung Han`s (born 1947, living in Taipei) work on flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hsutunghan/

art-hsu-tung-han-01-768x764
Wood-Pixelated-Sculptures-By-Hsu-Tung-Han-1
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images1K1JL2X4

About Hsu Tung Han`s Art

Entitling his artworks ‘Pixelations’, the artist interprets his carved figures of men and women as puzzles, and plans each piece through a series of drawings and clay models. Han produces his final sculptures from segments of walnut, teak, or African wax wood, carving cubed pieces from the art object to give the illusion of suspended levitation or a paused transformation.

The wooden sculptures of Hsu Tung Han are dynamically manufactured pieces of fine art. Using positive and negative space to great effect, the wooden blocks either push or pull. This gives his figures a dynamism that seems to set them in motion. Whether appearing to move forward or remaining in a calm position, each sculpture presents a masterclass in how the artist can manipulate a medium.

Tipp No. 8 (revised): Amazing 3D Organic Forms In Biomorphic Shapes by the Artist Sui Park (South Korea, now: USA)

arts, Creatures, humor, Kunst, Nature, Tipps
Mostly-Cloudy-at-PFL861_861
Clouds
Undulating Beauty
Sprout-1-861_861
BT-3861_861
Between Tides
Blue-Print-3-861_861
2.-Flow861_861
Flow
Journey-3-861_861
Memories-4-861_861
Memories

ABOUT THE ARTIST SUI PARK

Sui Park _ 박수이

Sui Park is a New York based artist born in Seoul, Korea. Her work involves creating 3-dimensional flexible organic forms of a comfortable ambiance that are yet dynamic and possibly mystical or illusionary. 

She is currently holding a solo exhibition, Floating Imagery at the Pelham Art Center, Pelham, New York. She also had a solo exhibition, Playing with Perception at the Denise Bibro Fine Gallery in Chelsea, New York, Garden of Humans at the Kingsborough Community College, CUNY in Brooklyn, NY in 2016. She participated in over 80 exhibitions, including an ongoing exhibition, The 5th Textile Art of Today at Danubiana Meulensteen Art Museum in Bratislava, Slovak republic where she received the Excellent Award in September 2018. Park’s artwork has been acquired by numerous places including Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in United States.

Sui Park’s education includes MDes in Interior Architecture at Rhode Island School of Design in 2013 and BFA in Environmental Design at Maryland Institute College of Art in 2011. Sui Park also has MFA and BFA in Fiber Arts at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

THE ARTISTS STATEMENT

My work involves creating 3-dimensional organic forms mostly in generic and biomorphic shapes. Through these forms, I attempt to express seemingly static yet dynamic characteristics of our evolving lives. While they resemble transitions, and transformations of nature, the forms are also to capture subtle but continuous changes in our emotions, sentiments, memories and expectations.

I weave and connect traces and tracks of the subtle changes into organic forms. The organic forms are made with mass-produced industrial materials, in particular, Monofilament and Cable Ties. They are non –durable, disposable, trivial, inexpensive and easily consumed materials. But, when I weave and connect them, they are transformed into organic visualizations. I want them to be creating lasting moments, evoking and encapsulating our precious thoughts.

I often find these moments from nature. I think nature allows us to pause and find things that have been overlooked and are inspiring. Nature provides me with rooms to find breakthroughs and answers, and gives me time to ponder into thoughts. Through my work, I want to bring to our attention the moments that nature allows us to find and look back. I present nature in abstract porous ways so that they can be filled with our moments.

For more details and further impressions of her arts, please have look at her website: http://www.suipark.com …if you share my enthusiasm.

Sui Park is also represented on Instagram and Pinterest with her organic installation arts.

Her contact details according to her website:

suiparkart@gmail.com
artist.suipark@gmail.com

Tipp No. 65: Fearless Realism or Dark Surrealism with a dash of Irony? – Modern Arts by Tetsuya Ishida (1973 – 2005)

arts, humor, Insights, Kunst, Psychologie, psychology, Reisen, Travel
Waiting for a Chance
Descendant
Recalled
Untitled
Cargo
Wild
Awakening

About The Artist:

Tetsuya Ishida was born 1973 in Yaizu, Shizuoka, the youngest of four sons. His father was a member of parliament and his mother a housewife. He graduated from Yaizu Central High School in 1992. Ishida stated in interviews that it was during this period that his parents and school principal put pressure on him to thrive academically and develop a career as a teacher or chemist. This experience later appeared in some of his paintings that explore the society’s expectations of youths.

Ishida entered Musashino Art University where he majored in Visual Communication Design. He graduated in 1996. Ishida’s parents, unhappy about his career choice, refused to provide financial support during his university period.

Ishida and film director Isamu Hirabayashi, a friend from his university days, formed a multimedia company to support their work together as collaborators on film/art fusion projects. Facing economic difficulties during Japan’s 1990s recession, their joint venture shifted to become a graphic design company. Ishida left the company to develop his own career as a solo artist.

From 1997 to 2005 he won a growing following, a number of awards and exhibitions, and positive praise of his works, which enabled him to work full-time as an artist until his sudden death.

On May 23, 2005, he was instantly killed by a train at a level crossing in Machida, Tokyo. He was 31 years old. There statements and rumors (?) that his death might have been suicide.

The 3 major themes of Ishida’s artworks:
  • Identity, norms and rules
  • Claustrophobia, isolation and lack of freedom
  • Utilitarianism and conformity

In contrast to his fellow countrymen, who are silenced by the rules of tradition, education, standards / norms and ethics, Tetsuya expressed through his art how he felt about the challenging living conditions in modern Japan.  It is said that he was bold and flamboyant, often baffling people but mostly astonishing the masses with his fearlessness.  

His artwork is breaking Japanese taboos in many facettes. The Japanese society was and is neither used to deal with blunt criticism, individual (unsatisfied) basic needs, outsiders, deviations as well as with topics like isolation, claustrophobia, scepticism, identity crisis, anxieties, frustrations and other motifs, which Ishida portrayed.

Many have titled his work surrealist portrayals of his observations as a child. Others call his work just plain madness.  People, all over the world, appreciate the humor and realism in Ishida`s work that often highlights the extrinsic but also intrinsic compulsion to ensure conformity. An obsession that finally results in self-harming behaviours.

I remember the  Japanese proverb: “The nail, which sticks out, has to be hammered down.”…and bent nails have to be removed. 

Ishida’s artwork is sometimes difficult to interpret. It is unsettling and doesn`t leave the viewer blasé.  When we think of Japanese art, we imagine quiet, flowing gardens painted with soft, neat patterns or an ancient pot, ingrained with history. Criticism in contemporary arts is often encoded or at least softened by a huge portion of “sweetener” or sugar coating. Ishida did not care. His confrontative, dark work is a slap into the face or a scream. Nevertheless, his arts is appreciated not only internationally but also in his homeland.

In 2009, his family was awarded the purple Japanese Medal of Honor, a decoration reserved for those who have contributed to academic and artistic developments, improvements and accomplishments.

A Man Who Lost His Ability To Fly

His post-mortem website: https://tetsuyaishida.jp/71843/?lang=en