Tipp No. 100: “Anthropocene” – Amazing Landscape and Industrial Photography by Edward Burtynsky (Canada)

arts, Insights, Kunst, Movie, Nature

It was a tough decision to select examples of EDWARD BURTYNSKY`s brilliant series of landscape and industrial photography.

Well, I would like to introduce the ANTHROPOCENE PROJECT that includes a collection of remarkable photographic insights to you…

“[We] come from nature.…There is an importance to [having] a certain reverence for what nature is because we are connected to it… If we destroy nature, we destroy ourselves.”
– Edward Burtynsky

Phosphor Tailings Point #4
Near Lakeland, Florida / USA 2012
Saw Mills #1,
Lagos / Nigeria 2016
Imperial Valley #4
California, USA 2009
Lithium Mines #1
Salt Flats, Atacama Desert, Chile 2017
Clearcut #2
Palm Oil Plantation, Borneo / Malaysia 2016

THE AESTHETIC OF DESTRUCTION

To talk about “Terraforming” of the Earth by mining, urbanization, indus-trialization, industrialized agriculture, deforestation, etc. that is resulting in a reduction of biodiversity, climate changes, equalized biogeographies etc. is a minimization in my view. Let`s face the truth…it is bare destruction.

EDWARD BURTYNSKY is able to capture moments of heart-breaking beauty even within all this destruction. Sometimes it takes a second till you realize the entire scenario. I think, this smart twist contributes to the feeling of disturbance, his work is leaving.

FINE ARTS TO MAKE THE UNSEEN VISIBLE AND TO RISE AWARENESS

Watching his outstanding landscape photography involuntary leaves you with the impression that our planet is eaten alive — by us.

Deadly injured, covered with open wounds and scars, the Earth still provides us with all resopurces we need to further expand, dominate the creation and grow our population without any rhyme or reason.

Desparation, feeling helpless, and guilty… Let`s begin with changing ourself. I am sure that each one of us knows best where and how he is able to reduce his personal ecological footprint….Right?

BY THE WAY, WHAT IS THE “ANTHROPOCENE”?

Admittedly, I had to look it up….

The Anthropocene is a proposed epoch dating from the commencement of significant human impact on the Earth’s geology and ecosystems, including, but not limited to, anthropogenic climate change. Various different start dates for the Anthropocene have been proposed, ranging from the beginning of the Agricultural Revolution 12,000–15,000 years ago, to as recent as the Trinity test in 1945.
The most recent period of the Anthropocene has been referred to by several authors as the Great Acceleration during which the socioeconomic and earth system trends are increasing dramatically, especially after the Second World War. (wikipedia)

Ähnliches Foto
Anthropocene – The Sinkhole in Guatemala City (image of the ETH Zurich)

ABOUT THE ANTHROPOCENE PROJECT

Another collaboration from Nicholas de Pencier, Edward Burtynsky, and Jennifer Baichwal, The Anthropocene Project is a multimedia exploration of the complex and indelible human signature on the Earth.

Originally conceived as a photographic essay and the third in a trilogy of films including Manufactured Landscapes (2006) and Watermark (2013), the project quickly evolved to include film installations, large-scale Burtynsky High-Resolution Murals enhanced by film extensions, 360° VR short films, and augmented reality installations.

Embracing and developing innovative techniques, the trio embarked on an epic journey around the world (to every continent save Antarctica) to capture the most spectacular evidence of human influence, while taking time to reflect on the deeper meaning of what these profound transformations signify. The result is a collection of experiences that will immerse viewers in the new world of the Anthropocene epoch, delivering a sense of scale, gravity, and impact that both encompasses and moves beyond the scope of conventional screens and prints.

The project includes:

  • a major travelling museum exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario and National Gallery of Canada before it will travel to Manifattura di Arti, Sperimentazione e Tecnologia (MAST) in Bologna in Spring 2019;
  • a new release of Edward Burtynsky photographs;
  • a feature documentary film;
  • immersive interactive experiences in augmented and virtual reality;
  • an art book published by Steidl;
  • and a comprehensive educational program.

theanthropocene.org

IN THE NEWS (09th Jan. 2019): ANTHROPOCENE won $100K Rogers Best Canadian Film Award – Congratulations!

ABOUT EDWARD BURTYNSKY

Edward Burtynsky (born February 22, 1955) is Canadian photographer and artist known for his large format photographs of industrial landscapes. His work is housed in more than 60 museums including the Guggenheim Museum, the National Gallery of Canada, the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid, the Tate Modern in London, the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris and others.

Burtynsky received his BAA in Photography/ Media Studies from Ryerson University in 1982, and in 1985 founded Toronto Image Works, a darkroom rental facility, custom photo laboratory, digital imaging and new media computer-training centre catering to all levels of Toronto’s art community.

Early exposure to the sites and images of the General Motors plant (the workplace of his father) in his hometown helped to formulate the development of his photographic work. His imagery explores the collective impact we as a species are having on the surface of the planet; an inspection of the human systems we’ve imposed onto natural landscapes. 

Edward Burtynsky won several well-known prices & awards (e.g. Officer of The Order of Canada in 2006) and received several honorary doctorates.

Furthermore, he is an active lecturer on photographic art, who is welcome in various notable galleries, universities and libraries.

His images appear in numerous periodicals each year including Canadian Art, Art in America, The Smithsonian Magazine, Harper’s Magazine, Flash Art, Blind Spot, Art Forum, Saturday Night, National Geographic and the New York Times.

For further details, please feel free to visit his website that contains more galleries of awesome photos, an overview of his publications and EDWARD BURTYNSKY`s event calendar:

https://www.edwardburtynsky.com/

Sorry for the lack of posts recently, I’ve been pretty busy balancing freelance design work with illustration, so haven’t had a lot of time for the blog. I’ll try and post a little more regularly throughout the summer. I drew this cloud mining station (think the dirty underside of Bespin Cloud City) a while ago, […]

via Cloud Mining — this northern boy

Comment:

Poster, prints and postcards of the amazing drawings of Rob Turpine are available in the online shop Ellispress…

web: https://ellipress.co.uk/shop/tnb

Furthermore, Rob is offering commisions.

Here are some appetizer…

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Shared No. 61: “The Cloud Mining Centre” and other brilliant illustrations & drawings by This Northern Boy

arts, Kunst, Tipps, Uncategorized

Tipp No. 38: Wonderful, Supersize Graffiti in Poland – by various street artists

arts, Cartoons, humor, Insights, Kunst, Reisen, Tipps, Travel
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Poland has become the land of the giants.

In cities across the country artists have transformed the sides of houses and apartment blocks with enormous murals, some pieces stretching upwards of ten stories.
The artists behind most of the colossal pieces are Przemyslaw Blejzyk and Mateusz Gapski, also known as Sainer and Bezt, and collectively as “Etam”.

The two twenty-somethings met at art college in the central Polish city of Lodz having been into graffiti in their teens. They now work together on many of the projects.

The duo has also worked with Natalia Rak, another young Polish artist who has produced her own larger-than-life pieces in Poland and the United States.

Most of the recent projects by Rak and Etam have been commissioned by local city festivals, which have given the artists permission to paint without worry about being caught or prosecuted.

From a tumbling jockey to a fantasy tree house, the artists employ a mix of modern styles and motifs from traditional Polish folklore.
Each piece takes around a week to produce., and the reaction from the public is usually positive. The street artists invite the people to stop for a minute and to turn on their imagination.

Tipp No. 13: “Poetry of Urban Solitude” – Fine Art Photography by Pedro Correa (Spain, now: Belgium)

arts, Kunst, Tipps

“Poetry of Urban Solitude” (cit. Washington Post) is a perfect description of Pedro Correa`s fine art photography that seems to push the boundaries of abstraction and photography.

Urban lifestyle is fast-paced, busy and often a bit superficial, as we all know. Astonishingly, Pedro Correa manages it to capture a moment of melancholy and truth. His work shows the moment somebody is pausing for a split second and possibly reconnect with oneself and his emotions unintentionally — before taking a deep breath and hurling oneself into the hustle & bustle of the awakening urban jungle again. In this context, I thought of the Zen-inspired imperative of “living in the here & now”, frankly speaking. But what if the “here & now” let us painfully feel our loneliness and unmet longings?

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE JUST A DISCONNECTED OBSERVER?

The rare moments of courage & inner strength somebody displays his true state of mind – allowing others to empathically bond with this person and finally with themselves too – ….are pure poetry.

On the other hand, it is quite comfortable and exciting to take the role of a laid back, remote observer without being too much involved in the disdainful all-day life others seems to be entrapped. It sharpens your perception, lateral thinking skills and allows you to dig deeper than others who might be personally involved. And admittedly, observers wrongly used to feel a bit superior and therefore, less vulnerable.

ABOUT CROSSING THE THIN RED LINE

To close the loop: Yes, in my view Pedro`s works include this element of observation …. in both senses, as described above. This ambivalence creates a tension which is fascinating to me. Obviously, there is a very thin red line between independence (being an observer only) and feeling disconnected. The dosis makes the poison.

However, these are just my thoughts…Actually, I instantly fell in love with his photo “Lazy Sunday” in particular.

Despite of my fear that somebody will purchase the last edition of Lazy Sunday before I am able to get hold of it, I`d like to share this awesome photography and other impressive examples of Pedro Correa`s “Urban Poetry” with you….

Lazy Sunday, 2013
Espresso Bar
The Sun Is Shining Above The Clouds
Winter Rose, 2014
CheckMate, 2014

About Pedro Correa

Born in Madrid in 1977, Pedro Correa moved to Brussels at the age of 14, where he studied oil painting and comic art at the Brussel’s Royal Academy of Arts in parallel with a PhD in image processing at the University of Engineering of Louvain.

POETRY OF MOMENTS OF EMOTIONAL FRAGILITY

In his artistic development Pedro Correa soon became fascinated by photography and the possibility to capture poetic and fragile moments.

Clearly influenced by his impressionistic painting background (his mother is also a painter), his style was born by experimenting with ways of injecting the emotions of impressionism into the “decisive moment” of photography, without manipulating or digitally retouching the image. He soon became able to create a body of work that transcends what lies in plain sight, by giving as much importance to a rigorous composition of the image as to the subtle and invisible atmosphere that is part of the scene.   

URBAN IMPRESSIONS THAT MAKE THE UNSEEN VISIBLE

After leaving his day-job as a Project Manager for a multinational corporation in 2012 in order to become a full-time fine art photographer, he created his most transversal body of work, Urban Impressions, as a manifest for reconnecting with the invisible and the present moment, in order to find the beauty that surrounds us without us noticing it.

His works have been exhibited and acquired worldwide by public and private collections, and is currently represented in galleries of Washington DC, London, Paris, Ile de Ré, Basel, Antwerp and Brussels.

“In 2017 the Washington Post critic defined this series as “poetry of urban solitude”.

Bildergebnis für pedro correa photography
Pedro Correa

Please, feel free to visit his website with further galleries, sales offers and updated information about his exhibitions:

Website: http://www.pedrocorreaphoto.com/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/pedrocorreart

Contact:
Email: pedrocorreaphoto@gmail.com

Tipp No. 151: “Sweet Dreams” – pop-art paintings by Wayne Thiebaud (USA)

arts, Cartoons, Creatures, Food, humor, Insights, Kunst, Psychologie, psychology, Tipps

Weirdly Calorie Bombs that are tempting only at first sight and from a distance.
On the second sight and looking at Wayne Thiebauds pies, ice cream, juice and other sweets, an uncomfortable feeling involuntarily creeps in.

The pastel colors (50s like, economic boom time with the promise that consumption will make us happy), the creamy color application that provides almost a 3D-effect and the delicious motifs and the beauty of the cakes, pies and ice cream rise your appetite…and then suddenly, you start thinking that some thing is terribly wrong.

Is it the degree of abstraction that let the pies & sweets look “lifeless” and like cloned with calculated deviations to pretend that the food is hand-/home-made?
Is it the arrangement of the food? It reminds on serial production and the showcases look like incubators in my view.
Is it the fetish-like, somehow aggressive (pushy) and clean presentation of the cakes, juice & ice cream?
The “cold, clinical light” creating amazing colorful shadows that provides a kind of “artificial touch” and lead to an association of food laboratory and industrialized, unhealthy fake food?
The motif seems to uncover the broken promises of advertisement.
The lack of a background?
Or details like the colored contour lines?

Somehow the bakery & candy looks dangerous not only because of the high sugar, fat and artificial flavoring substances contents but also because of its persuasiveness to makes us believe that we want it despite of the suspicion that it is not good for us.
These sweetened, sugar-coated products won`t nourish us. It won`t satisfy our hunger – neither the physical one nor the emotional one.
Consuming fluffy, creamy gateau – you can easily eat in binge eat – won`t fill the void in our lifes….in us.
These master pieces of product development are surrogats /substitutes for something you cannot buy.

No…These “Sweet Dreams” are – on the quiet – toxic.
Enjoy!

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Wayne Thiebaud (born November 15, 1920) is an American
commonplace objects—pies, lipsticks, paint cans, ice cream cones, pastries, and hot dogs—as well as for his landscapes and figure paintings.

Thiebaud is associated with the pop art movement because of his interest in objects of mass culture, although his early works, executed during the fifties and sixties, slightly predate the works of the classic pop artists.

Thiebaud uses heavy pigment and exaggerated colors to depict his subjects, and the well-defined shadows characteristic of advertisements are almost always included in his work.

You can find his stunning work in many famous collections.

On October 14, 1994, Thiebaud was presented with the National Medal of Arts by President Clinton.
He also received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Art from the American Academy of Design in 2001. 
Thiebaud was inducted into the California Hall of Fame in 2010 at the California Museum, Sacramento, 
and in 2013, he was honored with the California Art Award in recognition of his part in raising the prominence of California art around the world.

Shared No. 129: “Family Photo Friday!” — by John Spiers (Blog: My Life With Gracie)

arts, Cartoons, Creatures, Gedichte, humor, Kunst, Nature, poems, Tipps, Uncategorized, Zen

How about showing your appreciation and love?

Let your friends know, that you are always there for them, even if you don`t see each other.
The beautifully illustrated book “Seasons of Friendship” might be a nice gesture to do so.

Or do you like to make a new friend? Then show your true colors… and be kind and mindful!

Same time, you can support the charity work of ladies of the St. John`s Church in Portsmouth / Virginia, who will benefit of the sales.

You are welcome on John` s blog: “My Life with Gracie”, where you can find further details about the eBook for download and its paperback version.

The latter offers the opportunity to make your gift even more special by personalizing the book. You can leave a private message, quote or poem with your signature (you can find many friendship poems here at wordpress).
For a preview of the book, please click here…

John`s first beautiful first book “SEASONS OF FRIENDSHIP”
A collection of heart-warming stories & wisdoms of his charming backyard chickens

“SEASONS OF FRIENDSHIP” available as paperback book now!

“This book is perhaps best read outdoors in a shady peaceful spot, perhaps in your own little backyard garden, real or imagined. Whether you read just one chapter at a time, one seasonal section at a time, or the entire book all in one leisurely afternoon, it doesn’t matter. Whatever you choose as a reader, I hope you will imagine Gracie and the others sitting at your feet, bringing you peace and friendship.” (cit. John Spiers)

For more details…

CARING IS SHARING!

These are the stairs to the St. John`s Episcopal Church in Portsmouth which supports homeless people and all others who need help.
You purchase will be a small gift….
Let`s be kind and care for each other…

This illustration is based on my first “My Life With Gracie” drawing. It is still one of my favorites of Gracie because of it’s simplicity and innocence. Even with an elaborate background, this drawing reminds me how we can be both helpless and hopeful at the same time. Perhaps this is one of life’s delicate balances […]

via My Life With Gracie…From The Heart — My Life With Gracie

Hello to all of you,

I`d like to share another moving illustration of the blog “My Life With Gracie”.

Yes, there seems to be something bigger in life…

Life is like a jungle…full of heart-breaking beauty and opportunities but sometimes it is  also a bit intimidating because life is finally not predictable, contains pitfalls and requires a lot of difficult decisions over time.

To stay cool (composed) it might be of help to not take oneself too seriously and to change the perspective – even if you feel small, lost and vulnerable in this Big World.

Possibly, these situations – in which we`re looking for a way out or support – open our eyes & mind, lift our sight and widen our horizon best…

Don`t worry! In life there are no mistakes or wrong decisions. You are free to change your direction any time.

Shared No. 62: “My Life With Gracie…From The Heart” — by John Spiers (Blog: My Life With Gracie)

arts, Cartoons, Kunst

Tipp No. 27: TREATS! Pleasant Anticipation (Leckerli! Vorfreude) by Photographer Christian Vieler

arts, Creatures, humor, Kunst

Just to make you smile…!

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Photography by Christian Vieler

If you are interested in his funny book “Treats!” or in a photo shooting with your dog, please visit Christian Vielers website…

web: https://www.vieler-photography.com/

Cartoon No. 39: To Be Seen / Recognized – (Gesehen Werden)

arts, Cartoons, humor, Kunst, Psychologie, psychology, Zen
Fr Kerchnawe - Gesehen Werden.jpg

The Alien: Damn, there MUST be a better way!

On the map in the r-h-s Corner: Corn Circles

Tipp No. 23: “Art is a Weapon. Culture is a Form of Resistance” by Iranian Artist Shirin Neshat

arts, Insights, Kunst, Tipps
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THE ARTIST

Shirin Neshat is a contemporary Iranian artist best known for films such as Rapture (1999), which explore the relationship between women and the religious and cultural value systems of Islam. She has said that she hopes the viewers of her work “take away with them not some heavy political statement, but something that really touches them on the most emotional level.”

Born on March 26, 1957 in Qazin, Iran, she left to study in the United States at the University of California at Berkeley before her the Iranian Revolution in 1979. While her early photographs were overtly political, her film narratives tend to be more abstract, focusing around themes of gender, identity, and society.

Her Women of Allah series, created in the mid-1990s, introduced themes of the discre-pancies of public and private identities in both Iranian and Western cultures.

The split-screened video Turbulent (1998) won Neshat the First International Prize at the Venice Biennale in 1999.

The artist currently lives and works in New York, NY. Her works are included in the collections of the Tate Gallery in London, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, among others.