Tipp No. 104: “Below The Surface” – Spectacular Underwater Photography by Tobias Friedrich

arts, Creatures, Film, Insights, Nature, Reisen, Sports, Technology, Tipps, Travel

When I was a child, I dreamt of becoming a crew member of spaceship “Enterprise” in order to discover new worlds, unknown life forms and different cultures. Actually, I`ve lived this dream by chosing jobs that
allowed myself to travel a lot, to visit exotic places and which is even
more important to meet interesting people of in many aspects different cultures.

Scuba diving has been on my bucket list since childhood because I was
aware of the fact that the oceans are still “terra icognita” although about
71% of the earth`s surface (2/3) is covered with water of which 97,4% is salt-water.
From the very beginning, I had the idea that scuba diving could be the
unique opportunity to experience a kind of “space traveling” without the
need to meet NASA qualification requirements.

Of course, I was also inspired by the reports about Jaques-Yves Cousteau
and his adventureous expeditions when I finally took action and passed my scuba diving PADI open water exam in the Red Sea / Egypt many years ago.
It turned out that my phantasy of “space traveling” underwater was not completely absurd. As a scuba diver rookie, who is dependent on his
equipment and the goodwill of the sea dweller, I felt actually very vulne-rable. There was no doubt, it was me who was the intruder… the alien in this outlandish – almost surreal – water world! 

The spectacular underwater photography of Tobias Friedrichs brought
pre cious memories back…
Back on board after a beautiful dive, I was completely overwhelmed by
all the impressions and my emotions…Secretly and unnoticed a few tears
dropped into the Red Sea.
I didn`t recognize myself anymore because I was convinced to be quite
top-heavy and introverted. 
All this fragile beauty underwater was simply breaking my heart.
I learnt that beauty can be painful. In particular, if it is endangered by
pollution, mass tourism (I was a part of too) and climate change.   
Maybe, it was also a dash of desparation why I experienced this sudden
“crisis of joy”. 

Tobias Friedrich`s touching underwater photography allows us to sneek
a peak  cit.: “Below The Surface”. This motto might be ambiguous in
my case.

However, I` d like to share my fascination with you and invite you to
descent into The 50 Shades of Deep Blue….Enjoy the weightlessness, the flow, hushed sound level and not to forget the encounters with still quite unknown creatures who are often as curious as the human visitor!

Friendly encounter with a brown fur seal (South Africa)
Humpback Whale (Oman)
2 purple eye dwarf gobies, sitting on top of a hard coral near Marsa Alam (Egypt, Red Sea).
Face to face with a shark

ABOUT THE ARTIST

"From birth, man carries the weight of gravity on his shoulders. He is 
bolted to earth. But man has only to sink beneath the surface and he
is free."
Jacques-Yves Cousteau (1910 - 1997)

In his childhood Tobias Friedrich loved to watch the adventures of the Calypso with Jacques-Yves Cousteau as its captain and the beauty of the world that is below the ocean’s surface. It’s still an overwhelming feeling for him when he has the chance to dive. He loves the elegancy and calmness of the world under water standing in contrast to the hectic atmosphere above.

Tobias Friedrich lives in Germany and started taking pictures with a DSLR underwater in the year 2007. Since then his images have been published in prestigious scuba diving magazines and newspapers around the world.

Several underwater photographic competitions, have honoured his work, resulting in over 50 awards with nearly 30 1st places.

Lately, he has been named “Underwater Photographer of the Year 2018” in the prestigious UPY London competition.


The UPY 2018 awarded photo: A panoramic view of the cargo deck inside the SS Thistlegorm with the motorcycles in the middle and light to lighten the trucks on the side of the cargo deck, near Sharm el Sheikh, Northern Red Sea, Egypt.

All waters, from zero to 30° Celsius, are attractive for him, at least there is something to photograph.

Tobias`fine arts photography is not staged. His photography is rather a result of stamina, patience and opportunity. He is not working with photomontages. The panorama view – combining a view above and under the ocean surface – is achieved by utilizing a dome camera.
He is SEACAM equipment for his Canon EOS 1DX Mark II and 5D Mark II DSLR.

He is leading expeditions and workshops around the world, where everybody can join.

Please, feel free to visit his website that shows further amazing underwater photo galleries, panorama views, beautiful aerial views (highly recommended!) and a few offerings like:

  • Underwater photography BOOKS in German and English language,
  • His calendar “BELOW SURFACE 2019″
  • A collection of high-quality POSTCARDS with unique motifs
  • His schedule of awesome PHOTOWORKSHOPS 2019 (Destinations: Egypt, Bali, Philippines, Brother Islands) – simply click on “JOIN”.

web: http://www.below-surface.com

The Calendar 2019 by Tobias Friedrichs

Postcard No. 29: “Ulm – The Tallest Church of the World” (Germany)

arts, Insights, Oddities, Reisen, Tipps

The Ulm Minster is a Lutheran church located in Ulm, State of Baden-Württemberg (Germany). It is the tallest church in the world, and the 5th tallest structure built before the 20th century, with a steeple measuring 161,5 m (530 ft)… For further measurements, please scroll down at the end of the post.

The groundbreaking is dated in 1377. The city-owned Ulmer Münster in the city centre replaced the old Church “Ennet Feldes”(built 600 n. Christi) in front of the gates of Ulm city because during the numerous wars (like the 30 yrs War) the citizens often couldn´t attend church. The Münster was built on the location of another smaller, old church called “Our Beloved Woman” (dated 1220). The construction of the Ulmer Münster was completed in 1890, after 513 years of tough work. This period includes a couple of long-term interruptions due to wars, economic stagnation periods and power play waves.

The “Free City of Ulm” transformed into a fine arts cluster that built up an international trade, training, partnership & job network for artists and craftsmen

Ulm became famous for its highly skilled architects, artists and excellent craftsmen who were working on the church. The pool of talents and innovative senior professionals (entire families with several generations) with signature techniques was called “the Ulmer School” (late gothic). These experts often worked as expats in Europe and contributed to the construction of famous cathedrals & churches in Italy, Austria, Switzerland, Spain etc. 55 painters (walls, glass, facades, arts), 25 sculptors and woodcarvers are still known by their names today. In many cases, the artists cooperated with each other. The beautiful high altar in Blaubeuren is an example for the cooperation of 3 artists belonging to the Ulmer Schule.

Blaubeurener High Altar, 1494 (carved by
Michael Erhart, painted by Bernhard Strigel and Hans Holbein the Eldest).

Originally, the church was catholic. But in a referendum in 1530/31, the citizens of Ulm converted to Protestantism during the Reformation. Ulm Minster became a Lutheran church.

When I visited the famous, very beautiful traditional Christmas market in Ulm in front of the Ulmer Münster I was very much impressed. In fact, the top of steeple was partially covered by clouds. The illuminated church in the dark looked like a huge space rocket or spaceship ready for departure! Imagine the impression the church left in medieval times, when people didn´t know skyscrapers etc. The Münster must have been a mind-blowing demonstration of power and closeness to heaven.

Although sometimes referred to as Ulm Cathedral because of its great size, the church is not a cathedral as it has never been the seat of a bishop. Though the towers and all decorative elements are of stone masonry, attracting the attention of visitors, most of the walls, including the façades of the nave and choir, actually consist of visible brick. Therefore, the building is sometimes referred to as a brick church.

Ulm Minster was begun in the Gothic era but not completed until the late 19th century. Nevertheless, all of the church except the towers and some outer decorations was complete, unlike e.g. Cologne Cathedral, where less than half of the work had been done, when it ceased.

The Ulmer Iconoclasm in 1531 and the intentionally self-sabotage of the municipal authorities

In the course of the painful and also violent reformation process, Ulm experienced an iconoclasm. Many religious art pieces, such as 60 altars, sculptures and other artifacts were destroyed by the municipal council reps. But astonishingly, the municipal council acted responsibly and warned the owners and sponsors of the art pieces in advance. Therefore, a lot of artifacts could be rescued and stored in a warehouse that was well-known to the authorities. Thanks to this self-sabotage, you can find antique art works in the Ulmer Münster but also in little churches located in the surroundings of Ulm city.

In WWII, a devastating air raid hit Ulm on 17 December 1944, which destroyed virtually the entire town west of the church to the railway station and north of the church to the outskirts. The church itself was barely damaged. However, almost all the other buildings of the town square (Münsterplatz) were severely hit and some 80% of the medieval centre of Ulm was destroyed.

Today, visitors can climb the 768 steps that lead to the top of the minster’s spire. At 143 m (469 ft) it gives a panoramic view of Ulm in Baden-Württemberg and Neu-Ulm in Bavaria and, in clear weather, a vista of the Alps from Säntis to the Zugspitze. The final stairwell to the top (known as the third Gallery) is a tall, spiraling staircase that has barely enough room for one person.

For some details about the arts in the church and its sponsor (like Einstein), please scroll down.

The Ulmer Münster
The Genesis above the main portal
One of many dragon gargoyles.
High Altar (called Hutz Altar) by Martin Schaffner, 1521

Measurements

  • The height of the steeple is 161.53 metres (530.0 ft). Ulm Münster is the world’s tallest church
  • The church has a length of 123.56 metres (405.4 ft) and a width of 48.8 metres (160 ft).
  • The building area is approximately 8,260 square metres (88,900 sq ft).
  • The height of the central nave is 41.6 metres (136 ft), whilst the lateral naves are 20.55 metres (67.4 ft) high.
  • The volume of the edifice is some 190,000 cubic metres (6,700,000 cu ft).
  • The weight of the main steeple is estimated at 51,500 tonnes (50,700 long tons; 56,800 short tons).
  • The church seats a congregation of 2,000.
  • In the Middle Ages, before pews were introduced, it could accommodate 20,000 people, when the population of the town was about 5,000.

Works of Art

  • Late medieval sculptures include the tympanum of the main Western entrance depicts scenes from the Genesis. The central column bears a sculpture, the Man of Sorrows, by the local master Hans Multscher.
  • The 15th century choir stalls by Jörg Syrlin the Elder, made from oak and adorned with hundreds of carved busts are among the most famous pews of the Gothic period.
  • The pulpit canopy is by Jörg Syrlin the Younger.
  • The original high altar was destroyed by the iconoclasts of the Reformation. The current altarpiece from the early 16th century is a triptych, showing figures of the Holy Family and the Last Supper in the predella.
  • The five stained glass windows of the apse, which is in the form of half a decagon, show Biblical scenes and date to the 14th and 15th century.
  • The main organ of the church was destroyed by iconoclasts and replaced in the late 16th century. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is known to have played it in 1763. For some decades it was the largest organ in existence. In the late 1960s it was reconstructed to solve acoustic problems of reverberation.
  • In 1877, the Jewish congregation of the synagogue of Ulm—including Hermann Einstein, the father of Albert Einstein—donated money for a statue of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah. The figure was placed below the main organ.
  • Later renovations in the modern era added gargoyles and a sculpture, The Beggar, by the expressionist Ernst Barlach.

Shared No. 79: “Not My Cup of Tea?” Quick Hits: Teacup Commentary — by Canadian Art Junkie

arts, humor, Insights, Oddities
I love it…a very smart idea! Thank you for sharing “Canadian Art Junkie”.

Cheryl Pagurek’s latest work projects modern news images into delicate, old fashioned teacups and saucers. The cups become a window onto the world, merging past and present, private and public, order and chaos.

Quick Hits: Teacup Commentary — Canadian Art Junkie

Tipp No. 21: “Interlinked Despite of Socio-cultural Barriers” – Contemporary Art by Reena Saini Kallat (India)

arts, Kunst
salinenotations_echoes-22
Echoes (saline notations; poem quotation)
salinenotations_echoes-5
‘Hyphenated Lives’, Installation View
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Globalisation + Networking + Migration + Boundaries + Connections…About finding poetry in politics.

The Artist

Reena Saini Kallat’s (b. 1973, Delhi, India) practice spanning drawing, photography, sculpture and video engages diverse materials, imbued with conceptual underpinnings. She is interested in the role that memory plays, in not only what we choose to remember but how we think of the past.

Using the motif of the rubberstamp both as object and imprint, signifying the Bureau-cratic apparatus, Kallat has worked with officially recorded or registered names of people, objects, and monuments that are lost or have disappeared without a trace, only to get listed as anonymous and forgotten statistics.

In her works made with electrical cables, wires usually serving as conduits of contact that transmit ideas and information, become painstakingly woven entanglements that morph into barbed wires like barriers.

Her ongoing series using salt as a medium explores the tenuous yet intrinsic relationship between the body and the oceans, highlighting the fragility and unpredictability of existence.

Please, feel free to visit her website for any further information: http://reenakallat.com/

Postcard No. 27: LISBON – The Stunning Cult Bar “Pavillon Chinoise”

arts, Insights, Kunst, Oddities, Reisen, Tipps, Travel

When I entered the Pavillon Chinoise in Lisbon together with a few colleagues, I laughed out loud… I was simply not prepared – nobody gave me the slightest hint what to expect.

Crossing the door sill you enter another world – No… another universe with a milkstreet of planets filling 5 rooms of the former grocery store.

The Pavillon Chinoise is namely a true treasure bazaar. It gives home to numerous planet-like collections of thousands (or millions?) of art pieces of all kinds, aircraft, miniatures, military artifacts, trains, cars, ships, dolls, masks, mugs – and much more treasures dated in the period: 18th – 20th century.

You are overwhelmed and do not know where to look first. Not surprisingly, I am not able to share any information about food & beverage quality that is offered in this charming cult-bar with its cosy living room atmosphere. Who cares if you are busy with marveling at all the inspiring eye-candy that invites you to have a chat not only with your friends but also with strangers? This overabundance needs to be jointly digested.

Yes, I can definetely confirm the statement of the bar manager that guests usually return to the crazy Pavillon Chinoise that secretly seems to wink at you… Actually, I immediately had the same idea that I have to spend more time over there in order to rummage a little bit and to explore this hidden universe in more details.

The amazing PAVILLON CHINOISE is definetely a MUST-SEE in Lisbon!

The Bar Counter
The Aviation Room
Militaria
The Front Room

Pavilhão Chinês

Rua Dom Pedro V
1250-093 Lissabon

Highlights info row image

+351 21 342 4729

Postcard No. 26: “HELSINKI …radiates – not only in January”

arts, Insights, Kunst, Reisen, Tipps, Travel
The LUX Helsinki Festival 2019 has definetely conquered the Darkness. The “Ultraviolet Gallery” of animal portraits in Finlandia Halls forecourt.

The Helsinki Music Centre and its “Moonlight” Installation
Finlandia Hall Installation – in “Clear Water”-Blue
Oodo Library with quotation of the Cat Stevens song: Colours & Kids…
“We wanted to be the sky.”
The “Large Pendulum Wave” – a kinetic light installation that represents the poetry of mathematics and the beauty of physics
Colourful, warm welcome of the visitors by the Helsinki City Hall

Damn!
Did you miss the LUX Helsinki Festival 2019 too?


…just due to the fact that you have never heard about this stunning event?
Next year, we won`t have any excuse because here you are….some information about the awesome LUX Helsiniki Festival that transforms familiar buildings and spaces into unique works of urban art and attracts more than half a million visitors each year:

HELSINKI RADIATES – HOW TO ENLIGHTEN PEOPLE IN PERIODS OF DARKNESS (“OMG! Maybe, I watch too much world news, sorry!”)

Lux Helsinki sheded some light on the Finnish capital in its darkest winter hour with comforting annual regularity (January 5–9 in 2019). Artists from Finland and all over the world created a glowing urban gallery of colour, warming the city’s soul in the void that remains when Christmas and New Year’s Eve have come and gone.

The free festival offered a recommended trail complete with official guide and map, and combined established works and specially commissioned installations.

In 2019 LUX extended to include satellite attractions at Helsinki’s Old Student House and Cable Factory Cultural Centre, as well as the Hanasaari Swedish-Finnish Cultural Centre in neighbouring Espoo.
Helsinki’s magnificent new central library, Oodi (the name means “ode” in Finnish), took pride of place on a route of 12 lighting features leading past Finlandia Hall and the National Museum and looping through the district of Töölö.

Themes varied from simple visual delight to more challenging ideas. At Finlandia Hall, Immanuel Pax’s installation Trespassing explored the sinister ubiquity of security cameras. Outside the National Museum, Mexican Ghiju Diaz de Leon’s Shelter Seekers addressed issues of migration and climate change.

Exact weather conditions are hard to predict in early January, but they’re always likely to be chilly. Over the years Lux Helsinki visitors have braved everything from sleety blizzards to bone-freezing Arctic blasts.

(Article by Tim Bird, Jan. 2019 …Or did you think, I `ve mastered the English language in the meantime? That`s still work in progress.)

The exact week of the LUX Helsinki Festival 2020 is not published yet. But traditionally – also because of the long winter nights – the festival takes place in January.

For further details: https://www.luxhelsinki.fi/en/

Insight No. 72: Subversive Iranian Graffiti – Transforming Walls for Change

arts, Insights, Kunst, Reisen, Travel


Political art and propaganda has been central to the Islamic Republic’s management of public spaces since the earliest days of the Revolution. Take a 30-minute drive through any area of Tehran and you will doubtless bear witness to half a dozen murals commemorating fallen martyrs of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) or depicting the leaders of the Islamic Revolution. Two famous examples include the ‘Soldiers of the Islamic Revolution’ modernist fresco in Felestin (Palestine) Square, and the massive ‘Down with USA’ mural near Haft-e Tir, which portrays the American flag as a harbinger of war.

A strikingly prominent feature of Iranian public spaces is the prevalence of street art – both officially sanctioned murals and subversive graffiti of artists like Bambam, Oham, Black Hand and others. Whilst the latter can be ingeniously subtle, its social commentary usually ensures its speedy removal. Revolutionary murals often commemorate martyrs of the Iran-Iraq war, or celebrate the political values of the Islamic Republic. Here we feature some of the most fascinating street art in Tehran, Masal and Banda Abbas.

The youth unemployment rate in Iran is about 29%. Young people make up 40-50% of the total number of job seekers of 3,3 mio
Alcohol is prohibited in Iran
but it is sold under the counter and even produced privately. For alcohol drinking you will be punished with 40 – 80 lashings. In case of repeated consumption, you will end up in jail.
Protest graffiti in response to the fact that women were not allowed to attend the sinternational occer championship in Iran. The Iranian woman holds a bottle of cleaner like a soccer trophy.
Down With USA
US Embassy in Tehran
Weed consumption is quite common because the penalty for weed consumption is less severe than the one for alcohol drinking.
Iran is actually the 7th biggest market for make-up/cosmetics worldwide. Beauty & fashion (hidden below the Abaya) is a big issue in Iran.
Propaganda Graffiti

Tipp No. 23: Narrative Photography of Emotions by Laura Zalenga (Erzählerische Fotografie von Gefühlen)

arts, Kunst, Nature, Psychologie, psychology, Tipps
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THE ARTIST

“Laura is a 1990 Born portrait-artist from Southern Germany.

Besides photographing projects, she teaches workshops, gives inspirational talks and travels to all over the world – always searching for magical places and special light. It’s her clear visual language, the power of telling stories and showing raw, honest emotions in her photographs that makes her work stand out.

She is convinced that photography is a type of therapy that gives you the ability to heal yourself and others.”

Please, visit her Website: http://laurazalenga.com/

Tipp No. 91: Mystic Landscapes on Iceland – Fine Arts Photography by Mike Reyfman (Ukraine, now: USA)

arts, Kunst, Reisen, Travel

Beyond the cliché of the archaic “Land of Fire & Ice”, Iceland seems to offer space…Space just to be….to be your Self, in my view.

Iceland is definetely a destination to yearn for (Sehnsuchtsort). The well-known landscape photographer Mike Reyfman shares some breath-taking impressions with us.

Only people with a free spirit, a rich soul, an open mind and inner beauty are able to discover and catch these qualities in the outside world by taking pictures.

As an appetizer, let` s have a look at Mike Reyfmans perspective on Icelands landscapes…

Mike Reyfman

ABOUT MIKE REYFMAN

Mike Reyfman is renowned landscape and nature photographer.

He was born in Ukraine and moved to United States in January 2000. Mike has been awarded for his photography in the prestigious international photography competitions. His photographs have been used extensively worldwide in calendars, books, magazines and advertising industry. He has written numerous articles on travel and landscape photography and has been teaching photography for many years.

Mike is the founder of WORLDPHOTOTRAVELS.COM which runs photography workshops around the globe.

His works were exhibited at Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC, the open air exhibition on the prime outdoor places in Moscow and St. Petersburg, travel photography exhibitions at Sheremetyevo and Domodedovo International Airports etc.

In addition, Mike has an experience as photography competition judge and worked as a Jury member at WorldPhoto 2008, Global Arctic Awards 2012 and Patagonia Photo Awards 2017.

“When the great place, right moment, favorable light and sharp eye find each other — the photo is born.”
cit.: Mike Reyfman

For more details, additional galleries and print-outs for sale, please feel free to visit Mike`s website:

http://www.mikereyfman.com/

Tipp No. 13 (revised): “Poetry of Urban Solitude” – Fine Art Photography by Pedro Correa (Spain, now: Belgium)

arts, Kunst, Tipps

“Poetry of Urban Solitude” (cit. Washington Post) is a perfect description of Pedro Correa`s fine art photography that seems to push the boundaries of abstraction and photography.

Urban lifestyle is fast-paced, busy and often a bit superficial, as we all know. Astonishingly, Pedro Correa manages it to capture a moment of melancholy and truth. His work shows the moment somebody is pausing for a split second and possibly reconnect with oneself and his emotions unintentionally — before taking a deep breath and hurling oneself into the hustle & bustle of the awakening urban jungle again. In this context, I thought of the Zen-inspired imperative of “living in the here & now”, frankly speaking. But what if the “here & now” let us painfully feel our loneliness and unmet longings?

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE JUST A DISCONNECTED OBSERVER?

The rare moments of courage & inner strength somebody displays his true state of mind – allowing others to empathically bond with this person and finally with themselves too – ….are pure poetry.

On the other hand, it is quite comfortable and exciting to take the role of a laid back, remote observer without being too much involved in the disdainful all-day life others seems to be entrapped. It sharpens your perception, lateral thinking skills and allows you to dig deeper than others who might be personally involved. And admittedly, observers wrongly used to feel a bit superior and therefore, less vulnerable.

ABOUT CROSSING THE THIN RED LINE

To close the loop: Yes, in my view Pedro`s works include this element of observation …. in both senses, as described above. This ambivalence creates a tension which is fascinating to me. Obviously, there is a very thin red line between independence (being an observer only) and feeling disconnected. The dosis makes the poison.

However, these are just my thoughts…Actually, I instantly fell in love with his photo “Lazy Sunday” in particular.

Despite of my fear that somebody will purchase the last edition of Lazy Sunday before I am able to get hold of it, I`d like to share this awesome photography and other impressive examples of Pedro Correa`s “Urban Poetry” with you….

Lazy Sunday, 2013
Espresso Bar
The Sun Is Shining Above The Clouds
Winter Rose, 2014
CheckMate, 2014

About Pedro Correa

Born in Madrid in 1977, Pedro Correa moved to Brussels at the age of 14, where he studied oil painting and comic art at the Brussel’s Royal Academy of Arts in parallel with a PhD in image processing at the University of Engineering of Louvain.

POETRY OF MOMENTS OF EMOTIONAL FRAGILITY

In his artistic development Pedro Correa soon became fascinated by photography and the possibility to capture poetic and fragile moments.

Clearly influenced by his impressionistic painting background (his mother is also a painter), his style was born by experimenting with ways of injecting the emotions of impressionism into the “decisive moment” of photography, without manipulating or digitally retouching the image. He soon became able to create a body of work that transcends what lies in plain sight, by giving as much importance to a rigorous composition of the image as to the subtle and invisible atmosphere that is part of the scene.   

URBAN IMPRESSIONS THAT MAKE THE UNSEEN VISIBLE

After leaving his day-job as a Project Manager for a multinational corporation in 2012 in order to become a full-time fine art photographer, he created his most transversal body of work, Urban Impressions, as a manifest for reconnecting with the invisible and the present moment, in order to find the beauty that surrounds us without us noticing it.

His works have been exhibited and acquired worldwide by public and private collections, and is currently represented in galleries of Washington DC, London, Paris, Ile de Ré, Basel, Antwerp and Brussels.

“In 2017 the Washington Post critic defined this series as “poetry of urban solitude”.

Pedro Correa`s works have been exhibited and acquired worldwide by public and private collections, and is currently represented in galleries of Washington DC, London, Paris, Ile de Ré, Basel, Antwerp and Brussels.

Bildergebnis für pedro correa photography
Pedro Correa

Please, feel free to visit his website with further galleries, sales offers and updated information about his exhibitions:

Website: http://www.pedrocorreaphoto.com/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/pedrocorreart

Contact:
Email: pedrocorreaphoto@gmail.com